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ABA

Compound Schedules of Reinforcement

Posted by Lisa Dillon on

  Compound schedules of reinforcement: chained:  the response requirements of two or more basic schedules must be met in a specific sequence before reinforcement is delivered; a discriminative stimulus is correlated with each component of the schedule. mixed:   two or more basic schedules of reinforcement (elements) that occur in an alternating, usually random, sequence; no discriminative stimuli are correlated with the presence or absence of each element of the schedule, and reinforcement is delivered for meeting the response requirements of the element in effect at any time. concurrent:  two or more contingencies of reinforcement (elements) operate independently and simultaneously...

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Types of Prompts

Posted by Lisa Dillon on

Prompts are either stimulus prompts or response prompts.  Response prompts are supplementary antecedent stimuli used to occasion a correct response in the presence of an SD that will eventually control the behavior.  With response prompts, you have modeling, verbal instructions, and physical guidance.  Verbal instructions can be either vocal or non-vocal.  Vocal instructions are oral and non-vocal instructions can be either written words, pictures, or manual signs. Stimulus prompts are movement, position, and redundancy.

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Reflexivity Symmetry and Transitivity

Posted by Lisa Dillon on

Reflexivity is also known as generalized identity matching.  In the example below if you select a picture of a bike as the missing picture you would be demonstrating reflexivity if you had no prior matching training or reinforcement for doing so.   Symmetry if A = B then B = A.  The learner is taught when presented with the picture grapes (sample stimulus A) to select the written word grapes (sample stimulus B).  When presented with the written word grapes (sample stimulus B), without additional training or reinforcement, the learner selects the picture of grapes (sample stimulus A).  Applied Behavior Analysis...

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How to calculate Interobserver agreement

Posted by Lisa Dillon on

Applied Behavior Analysis is the science in which tactics derived from the principles of behavior are applied to improve socially significant behavior and experimentation is used to identify the variables responsible for the improvement in behavior.  By John O. Cooper, Timothy E. Heron, William L. Heward.  Applied Behavior Analysis (2nd Edition) The principles of Applied Behavior Analysis can be seen at work in a wide variety of applications.  Applied Behavior Analysis isn’t just for people with Autism or Autism Spectrum Disorders. For example, ABA can be used to help a person to eat healthier, and to exercise more.  ABA can...

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